Is The Australian Shepherd Right for You?

Australia’s multiculturalism and diversity continues to grow as people from around the world have settled into the country’s buzzing cities and breezy regional towns. Today, Australia’s rich assortment of backgrounds, cultures and communities influences everything from the food we eat to the celebrations we share. Mateship is the beating heart of the Australian spirit – it’s practically a national trait. Aussies pride themselves on being good friends and neighbours, and not just to people they know.

  1. Taking inspiration from the native surroundings runs true for many of Australia’s tasty tipples, too.
  2. Before committing to an Aussie, it’s important to consider if your lifestyle allows for ample amounts of time for play, exercise, and training.
  3. AKC is a participant in affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to akc.org.
  4. It’s the reason you’ll hear the words “no worries, mate” exchanged between strangers on the street.
  5. From the red sands of Uluru to the clear blue waters of the Great Barrier Reef and the flora- and fauna-rich rainforests, Australia is blessed with some of the most beautiful natural landscapes in the world – so it comes as no surprise that Australians love to be outdoors.

Of course food, events, art and history are all vital parts of the Australian culture, but what really distinguishes an Aussie is his or her laid-back outlook on life. It’s the way friends turn up unannounced for a catch-up (but always with a six-pack of beer in hand). It’s the reason you’ll hear the words “no worries, mate” exchanged between strangers on the street. Most of all, it’s about putting aside stress to appreciate the good things in life that are right in front of you. Most Aussies are happiest with a job, and training in different activities can be that job. Getting your Aussie involved in dog sports, therapy work, herding activities, or other activities is a great way to channel their energy and strengthen your bond.

Where to Adopt or Buy an Australian Shepherd

In some ways the term “Australian culture” is actually something of a misnomer, as Australia is an incredibly culturally diverse country, with a generations-long history of large waves of immigrants from all over the world, notably the UK, Southern Europe, South East Asia, and most recently Africa. You may have a picture of the typical Aussie as a wheat farmer or cattle rancher living on a huge property in the middle of nowhere, toiling in the burning sun day to day. However, 85% of Australians live on the coast and 67% of the total population of the country live in the nation’s eight capital cities. Australians are known their laid-back and relaxed attitude to life, and this is true to an extent at least. You’ll likely meet quite a few locals who are chilled out, and take the time to enjoy life. This is particularly true in “the bush” – the rural areas of the country and in surfing communities like Byron Bay or Noosa.

The breed continued to be refined in the U.S. into what we know as the Aussie today and became especially popular in Western U.S. culture as a ranch and rodeo dog. Not all homozygous merles are affected, but most are, making the breeding of two merles a very touchy subject. However, deaf or blind Australian shepherds can make wonderful pets given a home prepared for their special needs.

An Australian shepherd typically should be fed two meals per day of a nutritionally balanced dog food. The amount will depend on your dog’s size, activity level, age, and other factors. An adult Australian shepherd might eat as many as 5 cups daily, split between two meals. Due to their high intelligence, Aussies are generally receptive to training and learn quickly. Start training when the dogs are puppies with socialization to different people and environments as well as basic commands like sit and stay.

The American Kennel Club first recognized the Australian shepherd breed in 1991. The AKC later recognized the miniature American shepherd, a smaller version of the Aussie, in 2015. AKC is a participant in affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to akc.org. If you purchase a product through this article, we may receive a portion of the sale.

In a funny twist of fate, the Australian shepherd’s origin may not really involve much of Australia at all. In fact, the American Kennel Club says the Aussies we know today are actually descendants of herding dogs from Basque sheepherders from the Pyrenees mountains of Europe who immigrated to America for work in the mid-19th century. These shepherds brought their “little blue dogs” with them to work the land in Western states like Wyoming and Colorado, where ranchers fell in love with the sturdy hard-working breed. The name of the breed is technically a misnomer, as it was developed in California in the 19th century, although it has its origins in Asturias, in the northwest of Spain; the breed was unknown in Australia at the time. It is claimed that Australian Shepherds descend from a variety of herding breeds, including collies imported, alongside sheep, from Australia and New Zealand; the breed reportedly took its name from this trade.

Popular in Grammar & Usage

Nourish, condition, and strengthen your damaged hair from within with our intense hydrating mask. The dog has a stride in which its front and back legs cross over, making for an appearance of “on the edge” speed. The dogs instinctively use a “pounce” position to deal with cattle trying to kick them.

The current Australian resident population is estimated at 27,470,000 (1 February 2024).[92] This does not include Australians living overseas. In 2015, 2.15% of the Australian population lived overseas, one of the lowest proportions worldwide.[93] This ratio is much lower than many other countries in the OECD. The following table shows Australia’s population by country of birth as estimated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in 2021. It shows only countries or regions or birth with a population of over 100,000 residing in Australia.

HAIR TO

You don’t have to own an acreage to keep an Aussie happy—though that might be an ideal set-up for this active breed! Because of their activity needs, Aussies aren’t the best match for apartment living unless you’re able to get outside for a stimulating walk, hike, or game of Frisbee at the dog park for at least 40 minutes every day. During the 1950s, Australia was the destination of 30 per cent of Dutch emigrants and the Netherlands-born became numerically the second largest non-British group in Australia.[56] In 1971, 70 percent of the foreign born were of European origin. From the red sands of Uluru to the clear blue waters of the Great Barrier Reef and the flora- and fauna-rich rainforests, Australia is blessed with some of the most beautiful natural landscapes in the world – so it comes as no surprise that Australians love to be outdoors. This passion for nature runs deep through Australia’s veins, and is anchored in the foundations of the country’s history; a respectful connection with the earth has been central to Aboriginal culture for more than 50,000 years. If there’s one thing Aussies are known for, it’s their easy-going, friendly attitude.

In addition to having a genetic predisposition for heterochromia, Aussies have a one-in-five chance of being born with a naturally bobbed tail. Ranchers purposely bred Aussies that had these naturally short tails because they are safer when it comes to herding. But with the Grammys, the back half of the residency and an expanded rerelease of “Tension” due in the coming months, “Padam Padam” feels less a culmination of her career than the beginning of a new chapter. Australia also has its own set of vocabulary which fits in with this predilection for casual forms of language. Lots of words are shortened with an “o” or an “ee” sound put on the end, so that they roll off the tongue a little easier. Slang is commonly used in conversation across the country and in all levels of society.

A passionate sporting culture

Eager to please, Aussies are quick to learn and enjoy regular training sessions. They respond well to positive-reinforcement training methods, and many Aussies go on to thrive in agility training once they master obedience basics. While the average owner probably won’t beaxy be taking this dog to herd livestock out on the farm, many professionally-trained Aussies work as search-and-rescue, narcotic detection, and guide dog roles. If you want to become the proud owner of an Australian shepherd, take the time to do your research first.

Aussies are an extremely intelligent, loyal, and hard-working breed that makes excellent companions for active people and families. They are adept at herding, dog sports, and search-and-rescue—they can even be therapy or https://traderoom.info/ service dogs. As an affectionately nicknamed “Velcro dog,” Aussies prefer being with their people for most of the day, and may not be the best fit for someone who works long hours due to potential separation anxiety.